Truth in Fiction


bigringriding:

MASSIVE BRONER FOR HENRI VAN LERBERGHE, THE ‘DEATHRIDER OF LICHTERVELDE’, RIGHT NOW.
HE TURNED UP ON THE START LINE OF THE 1919 TOUR OF FLANDERS STRAIGHT FROM THE TRENCHES WITHOUT A BIKE. HE BORROWED ONE, ATTACKED THE FAVOURITE JULES VANHEVEL IN FRONT OF HIS OWN HOUSE, AND STOPPED IN SIGHT OF THE VELODROME FOR A COUPLE OF BEERS BEFORE THE FINISH.
HE STILL FINISHED 14 MINUTES UP ON THE FIELD, DESPITE BEING SO WASTED HE HAD TO COMPLETE HIS LAP OF HONOUR ON FOOT.
INCIDENTALLY, HE WAS ALSO KNOWN AS ‘RITTE’ - AND WAS THE INSPIRATION FOR A CERTAIN KICKASS BIKE BRAND.

bigringriding:

MASSIVE BRONER FOR HENRI VAN LERBERGHE, THE ‘DEATHRIDER OF LICHTERVELDE’, RIGHT NOW.

HE TURNED UP ON THE START LINE OF THE 1919 TOUR OF FLANDERS STRAIGHT FROM THE TRENCHES WITHOUT A BIKE. HE BORROWED ONE, ATTACKED THE FAVOURITE JULES VANHEVEL IN FRONT OF HIS OWN HOUSE, AND STOPPED IN SIGHT OF THE VELODROME FOR A COUPLE OF BEERS BEFORE THE FINISH.

HE STILL FINISHED 14 MINUTES UP ON THE FIELD, DESPITE BEING SO WASTED HE HAD TO COMPLETE HIS LAP OF HONOUR ON FOOT.

INCIDENTALLY, HE WAS ALSO KNOWN AS ‘RITTE’ - AND WAS THE INSPIRATION FOR A CERTAIN KICKASS BIKE BRAND.

— 1 year ago with 65 notes

Blues According to Lightnin’ Hopkins - A film by Les Blank

Tip of the hat to http://building-blocks.tumblr.com/

— 1 year ago
#Blues  #bluesmen  #Lightnin' Hopkins  #Les Blank 
W.G. Sebald’s Former Students Share His Writing Advice →

  • Read books that have nothing to do with literature.
  • Get off the main thoroughfares; you’ll see nothing there. For example, Kant’s Critique is a yawn but his incidental writings are fascinating.
  • There has to be a libidinous delight in finding things and stuffing them in your pockets.
  • You must get the servants to work for you. You mustn’t do all the work yourself. That is, you should ask other people for information, and steal ruthlessly from what they provide.
  • None of the things you make up will be as hair-raising as the things people tell you.
  • I can only encourage you to steal as much as you can. No one will ever notice. You should keep a notebook of tidbits, but don’t write down the attributions, and then after a couple of years you can come back to the notebook and treat the stuff as your own without guilt.
  • Don’t be afraid to bring in strange, eloquent quotations and graft them into your story. It enriches the prose. Quotations are like yeast or some ingredient one adds.
  • Look in older encyclopaedias. They have a different eye. They attempt to be complete and structured but in fact are completely random collected things that are supposed to represent our world.
  • It’s very good that you write through another text, a foil, so that you write out of it and make your work a palimpsest. You don’t have to declare it or tell where it’s from.
  • A tight structural form opens possibilities. Take a pattern, an established model or sub-genre, and write to it. In writing, limitation gives freedom.
  • If you look carefully you can find problems in all writers. And that should give you great hope. And the better you get at identifying these problems, the better you will be at avoiding them.

(Source: nevver, via brianmichaelbendis)

— 1 year ago with 1338 notes
The significance of plot without conflict →

In the West, plot is commonly thought to revolve around conflict: a confrontation between two or more elements, in which one ultimately dominates the other. The standard three- and five-act plot structures—which permeate Western media—have conflict written into their very foundations. A…

(Source: stilleatingoranges)

— 1 year ago with 11847 notes